Sunday Newsletter

If you are one of our lucky subscribers, you've been privy to a lot of great content that we put together every week. Over the past two years, we have worked on developing a newsletter that you want to open and many of our subscribers have shared with us that they look forward to the newsletter every Sunday!

We'd love if you would join!  (or re-join and be introduced to a lot of useful and insightful information).

Sign up HERE

In our newsletters, we feature:

  • Hanging Tips
  • Information on wading through all the jargon associated with Framing
  • Suggestions on how to build a collection
  • Curating Tips
  • Behind-the-scenes photos from artist studios
  • Images of works in progress
  • Stories from our artists on their technique and inspiration
  • Invitations to upcoming events
  • Special sales

...and as always, an email filled with beautiful new artwork or specially curated collections!

Introducing Tim De Rose

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This winter you will find his stunning and labour-intensive paintings featured in Arabella Magazine's Artists To Collect series and with a CV like his, we are surprised it hasn't been earlier! Check out his article February 2016! Until then, you can read about his amazing accomplishments in his bio here, or below. We can't wait to see the new work that will arrive over the next few months and invite you to meet Tim next year at our 17th Annual Evening With the Artists!

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De Rose is influenced greatly by trees and forests, finding the setting to be intensely powerful. In exploring their quietness, he uses them as symbols of people and relationships. Deeply invested in the power of this subject matter, he comments on the open and unassuming way in which he approaches his work:

“I paint in a series with a style that is evolving all the time. I paint within that style until it lets me go. I don’t use any theories of colour, perspective or representative techniques for light and shade.”

Tim begins his process by photographing his arboreal subjects, looking for striking compositions and arrangements from which to base his painted works. From there, he begins drafting a complete line drawing to solidify his composition. To create depth with his medium, he adds as many as four layers of paint. Energetic textures and patterns begin to emerge by a meticulous etching and scraping away of these layers with a potter’s tool called a serrated kidney. In this part of his process, one can detect the essence of De Rose’s early roots in pottery surface.

Tim, in fact, began his successful arts career in the realm of pottery. As his skills in pottery grew, so did the range of projects he took on. These involved anything from hand building architectural sculpture, to ceramic wall panels. These clay canvases were etched, sculpted, and glazed in such a way that eventually they morphed into something approaching traditional paintings. In this way, one project leading to another, De Rose ultimately spent about thirty percent of the time painting. Around 1996, he came to realize how significantly painting was missing in his creative spectrum, and found that he enjoyed using the “different muscles of the process and the problem solving” that it involved. Tim affirms that he can’t say that he loves one art form more than the other, but has confirmed that after 45 years of pottery, he’s now determined to devote himself to painting full time.

Tim De Rose's work can be found in Kingston and at Crescent Hill Gallery in Mississauga.

Find your favourite artist!

Browsing through our online gallery and not sure where to start? Start here!

To help you navigate our collection of talented artists, we've devised a snappy flowchart to guide you towards the artists that, based on your answers, we think you'll love!

Since we had a rare week with no new arrivals to the gallery, we set ourselves to the task of making sure you had something different, and a little bit fun, to occupy the space between our next newsletter and blog post.

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We hope you’ll join us!

Fall Group Show Invite 2014Crescent Hill is thrilled to announce the first of three upcoming shows happening this fall and into the winter. Works for each show will only be posted online the day before the opening, so keep an eye out for your favourites. With new works from renowned artists such as Julia Klimova and Peter Panov, we guarantee these incredible pieces will not stay in the gallery long! RSVP to win a special gift selected by our Director! https://www.facebook.com/events/1471170519817021/?ref=22 or email us at info@crescenthill.com.

Pietro Adamo Interviewed by 1968Magazine!

Today we have a special edition of our 'Meet the Artist feature' - Pietro Adamo was recently interviewed by 1968Magazine, and we're happy to be able to share it with you! Please enjoy this special edition of Meet the Artist!

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Meet the Artist: Maureen McNeil

Welcome to the third edition of our Meet The Artist series: a monthly feature on our website giving you a little more information and perspective into the lives of our many talented artists!  We hope you enjoy this third edition in our series, and that you will look forward to future editions on the first Saturday of every month. Today we would like to introduce you to Maureen McNeil.  Her distinct style is an exciting part of the collections available here at the gallery, so we hope that you enjoy her work as much as we do, and that you enjoy learning a little more about this very talented painter.

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Give us a little history of you: where you came from and how you got where you are today: Sitting in my living room, my first house had big walls and needed some artwork, so I bought a canvas and started to paint with whatever I had in the house. I decided I was going to paint stick people because I loved groovy backgrounds with the simplicity of these figures in the front…never was figurative but was drawn to abstract….it was what I could paint, I loved the feeling of doing something that was totally childlike with a twist of sophistication with the choice of the size of canvas and color ,friends loved the result and always asked who was the artist I was surprised to find that I had fallen into something that was appealing to many. What inspires your work? I am inspired by people’s stories: give me a family tell me what they are passionate about, favorite sports team, colors, anything! Tell me what you love to do, and  I will paint it…family pets, your child’s dreams, living on a lake, back drop mountains, whatever exists in your life let me put it on canvas. Describe your technique: I start with a sketch, have colors in mind , then anything can happen. I never know exactly what will show up on the canvas. I need good music, a right frame of mind, and sometimes I will think about a painting for several days before I am ready to paint.  I breathe a lot when I am painting, at times the brush strokes are bold, at other times I have detail that kills my back! I think about the person that I am painting for, keeping them in the picture at all times so they will enjoy the commission forever. Describe your process from how you get your idea until it appears as a finished piece: I get my ideas from a detailed process, sitting with the client and knowing every minute detail of the painting, colors, favorite things, what inspires the client, why do you want this painting, what makes you happy, why you like my style, where do you want to hang this picture. After all the questions I think of our consultation, I focus on the client and channel what I see on to the canvas, with all the information that has been provided. It is an exciting task to match the personality with the painting and I take it very seriously. What other types of art and materials have you explored and what is your favourite medium?  I love exploring EVERYTHING…anything can be put upon a canvas, using my imagination and pushing buttons that no one else has gets me excited. Children love to touch, and see things pop out I love to produce this on a canvas. My favorite thing lately is gems, and high gloss mediums that produce fabulous texture. Is there something or someone who inspired you to start or did you just pick up and away you went? I originally started for myself but then transitioned to doing work for the sick children’s hospital. My very good friend nominated me when Gina Godfrey (Paul Godfrey’s wife) asked if she knew any artists that could contribute art for the Mistle Toe Ball, a huge fund raiser for the hospital.  My husband encouraged me to take a piece of my work into Crescent Hill Gallery. Then….there is my mom, I could do no wrong, she was a fabulous artist and thought my work was the bomb, she was so proud of me for all my accomplishments, it is what I treasure most. Tell us about people you’ve met along the way and decisions you made that shaped your journey:  To start I did work for the sick children’s hospital for several years , that inspired me to work more at my craft…the feedback was great so I knew I was on the right track. The artists at the gallery inspire me so much because of their accomplishments. I have always heard the term starving artist but see that the artists at the gallery are not starving and earn a great living from something that they are so passionate about. I have reached out and asked questions, (being fairly new in this business) and have found that the gallery and the artists are more than willing to share their knowledge that is so important to me. My friends and family are a great support especially my Mom I can still hear her voice cheering me on! Do you have any interesting stories from creating your art or in your day to day life? I am a thinker when it comes to the process of painting…I look at others work but keep in mind that my signature style is important…I know I am ready to paint when I get this feeling of excitement in my heart. I call on my kids to critique what I have done, they have an interesting perspective - sometimes they talk about the colors I have used, give me ideas that I would not think to put in the painting. I have a crazy imagination and like to put that on canvas…sometimes they tell me it doesn’t make sense, I like that, not everything has to make sense. How do your studio and surroundings influence your work? I keep my studio somewhat organized, although by the time I am finished a painting it is a mess! I do this intentionally I don’t want anything to disturb the creative process…I love that about my studio; it is the one room in my house that I can do and be whatever I want. When the painting is complete I always clean my space up, it puts me into the right frame of mind, on to new beginnings. Being at home is not a distraction for me, I love to hear the buzz of my children as I paint, music is always in the background, and it is a meditation that I love. What impresses you about other artists’ work and who impresses you today? I am impressed by children’s work…they have no agenda when they are painting. I have taught classes to 5 year olds, and one particular painting blew me away: this child painted in 30 minutes a piece of artwork that was surreal. Children don’t overthink like adults do, they have complete confidence and are not cluttered by any notions of what is right or wrong they just “do” and it is perfect in my eye. I learn a lot from their innocence. What differentiates you from other artists? I paint primarily for children, although I have adults that love my work as well. I appeal to children of every age. I don’t like to get serious with my work, I like it to be somewhat quirky so that the person looks at it and asks questions.I feel my work is different because I tend to break rules, be bold with my subject matter and “refuse” to paint faces on my subjects, this is what keeps me recognizable! Do you have a favorite tool to work with or that inspires your work? I inherited my mother’s brushes; they are so special to me. I use just about anything to give me the look that I want, credit cards, toothpicks, rulers, my fingers, spray bottles, nothing is off limits when I am being creative. What is your favorite thing to do on a Friday night, on the weekend, etc.? I love to be with my family up at the cottage. We put on a fire and make great dinners. I am very much a homebody -a lot of time is spent in Mississauga on the weekends, shuffling the kids around, making sure everyone is happy. It brings me great joy to see my family working hard and being successful at what they do.  Anything else you want to add? I had a dream - I wanted to be an artist. Crescent Hill Gallery gave me a chance and I am forever grateful for that…it has given me confidence and inspiration, my day is joyfully filled knowing that I have a job to do…thank you.  

Meet the Artist: Jacky MacDonald

Welcome to the second edition of our Meet The Artist series: a monthly feature on our website giving you a little more information and perspective into the lives of our many talented artists!  We hope you enjoy this third edition in our series, and that you will look forward to future editions on the first Saturday of every month. Today we would like to introduce you to Jacky MacDonald.  Her delightful style is a wonderful part to the collections available here at the gallery, so we hope that you enjoy her work as much as we do, and that you enjoy learning a little more about this very talented painter.

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Give us a little history of you: where you came from and how you got where you are today: I was born in Hull, Quebec in 1955.  As a little girl, I was never very good at school and often got caught drawing instead of doing my school work.  My parents must have thought I had talent to decide to enroll me in art classes at a very young age.  Every Sunday, my family and I would go visit the National Art gallery.  My Dad had a passion for art as well.  AS I grew up, I took fashion designing then went to University in languages because it was told that you could not get a career in arts. Taught french at Algonquin College.  All through those years, I continued to paint on my spare time.  After a few years, it was time to go back to art in a more serious way, so I went to the Ottawa school of art then had the opportunity to learn from renowned artist Philip Craig.  In 1999, The city of Hull gave me the opportunity to have a solo show to commemorate the Hull bicentennial.  All my paintings were of old Hull in the year 1900 or so.  One of my paintings was chosen from the city as a gift to Princess Astride of Belgium. I started selling my art at Art Shows when one day I was approached by an art gallery asking if I would be interested in selling at their gallery which I accepted. It seems the more I paint, the more passionate I get.  I love the smell of paint and love shopping for art supplies.   I go to bed thinking of what I will paint next.  I fall asleep dreaming of colours.  I get my best ideas at night. What inspires your work? A lot of the paintings I do are from Europe.  My paintings bring me back to the places I visited in France and Italy.  I do like to paint local too.   Describe your technique: I used to paint with paint brush but in the last couple of years, I have discovered the palette knife.  It’s wonderful what you can produce with a knife.  It’s a totally different feeling and the result is more alive.  Describe your process from how you get your idea until it appears as a finished piece: When I travel, My husband and I take thousands of photos.  When we come back home, I often will use 5 photos to create one painting and some of it is from my head.  Often, I will just start straight on the canvas without drawing first.  You could say I sketch with my palette knife. What other types of art and materials have you explored and what is your favourite medium?  I do pastel drawings of dogs and horses.  It’s nice to switch it over sometime but I love oils.  I have recently started working with acrylics but it doesn’t give me the same feeling as does oils. Is there something or someone who inspired you to start or did you just pick up and away you went? My Dad was my biggest fan.  He is the one that bought me my first set of charcoal at the age of seven. Tell us about people you’ve met along the way and decisions you made that shaped your journey:  I have to say that Philip Craig has been a great inspiration to me.  He taught me more then any other art courses I took.  He  encouraged me to start selling.  Without him, I don’t think I would be where I am now. Do you have any interesting stories from creating your art or in your day to day life? It so happens that the Royal Canadian Mint has asked me to present a painting for there 2013 $20.00 silver coin.  It is a competition so I may not win but just the thought of them calling me to ask me to participate is an honor. Keep your fingers crossed the deadline in Saturday the 24th of November. How do your studio and surroundings influence your work? My studio is above the garage and next to my bedroom.  I wake up in the morning and the first thing I do is go stare at my work and figure out where to go from there.  If I can’t sleep I night, I tip toe to the studio and start painting.  I am so lucky. What kinds of things do you keep in your studio for inspiration? My dog is always with me.  Charlie has his own bench that overlooks the front of the house.  Charlie seems to know when it’s time to play and when it’s time to paint.  He actually seems sad if I don’t go up to the studio when I usually do. What impresses you about other artists’ work and who impresses you today? What impresses me the most about artists is the way some of them can create such flow and harmony with so few brush strokes.  Leonard Wren is one artist that I think has an interesting technique. When you are not working and creating, what do you do? Do you have another job? In the morning I have a dog walking job.  I will pick up one to six dogs and take them to trails that I have been walking for 30 years.  We will spend up to two hours exploring, then I take them all back, go home, have a bite to eat and get ready to paint. Do you have a favorite tool to work with or that inspires your work? The palette knife.  I can start a painting with a few strokes of the knife and it will guide me to where the painting should go.  Sometimes those and up being my best pieces of work. What is the hardest thing about creating your art? Knowing when it’s finished. Do you prefer to do commissions or mostly what inspires you in life?  It’s always easier to create your own because it comes from your vision.  Commissions can be tricky because I have to put on canvas someone else’ thoughts and ideas. What is your favorite thing to do on a Friday night, on the weekend, etc.? I always look forward to Friday night and having a romantic dinner with my husband.  My husband and I spend a lot of time outside on weekends.  Whether it’s working on our backyard of playing tennis and swimming in the summer, cross country skiing in the winter, or going on hikes with our dog. What is your favorite food? I love all types of food.  Dim sum is one of my favorites. What is your favourite wine, or other drink? Louis Latour Pinot noir by far is my favorite.  Anything else you want to add? I love painting so much and I would love to inspire others too.  Painting is my life.  I don’t know what I would do if I couldn’t paint?

Meet the Artist: Bob Arrigo

Welcome to the second edition of our Meet The Artist series: a monthly feature on our website giving you a little more information and perspective into the lives of our many talented artists!  We hope you enjoy this second edition in our series, and that you will look forward to future editions on the first Saturday of every month.
Today we would like to introduce you to  Bob Arrigo.  His unique style is a wonderful part to the collections available here at the gallery, so we hope that you enjoy his work as much as we do, and that you enjoy learning a little more about this very talented painter. Give us a little history of you: where you came from and how you got where you are today: At the age of 5, I fell in love with drawing, and by 8 I dreamed about being a famous artist when I grew up.  In high school I won an award for being ‘The Student with the Greatest Achievements in Art’ – this award was accompanied by a grant covering 3 years of fine art education in downtown Toronto.  At this point in time I was selling original hand-thrown pottery to downtown gift boutiques to pay for art supplies.  I was then accepted as a student in the very first year at the Sheridan College Campus in Oakville – my course was Animation and Cinematography. Upon graduation I pursued a career as a professional musician and toured for about 5 years, but never stopped drawing, creating, and writing through that time. I created original commissioned sculptural macramé and multi media fibre art for designers and high-end retailers such as deBoers.  Books of my original designs have been published four times by a Canadian book publisher for distribution across North America. In 1979 I established Arrigo Signs and Graphics Inc., managing my own studio as well as supplying creative services to other sign companies, advertising studios and industry related businesses.  I placed Top 3 in a worldwide truck lettering competition by the largest and oldest industry trade magazine in existence, and my work and interviews were published several times by Signcraft Magazine: a competitive industry publication with head offices in Florida. It wasn’t until the late 90s that I began painting original oil and acrylic fine art.  I no longer dream of being a ‘famous’ artist, but of being and artist who is true to his calling.  This I find is a high ideal to achieve and maintain. What inspires your work? The fear of poverty (just kidding). Being primarily a landscape artist I would have to say my inspiration is nature, God’s masterpiece. But capturing even a fragment of the essence of what he created would be near miraculous! Describe your technique: About a year ago I transitioned from acrylic to oils and there is no question: that is where I will stay. I work with a brush in a heavy impasto wet on wet application. BobArrigo171235 BobArrigo171234             What other types of art and materials have you explored and what is your favourite medium? I have indulged myself in so many art mediums I honestly don’t think I could list them. But at this point in my life I can say without hesitation, I have settled on painting with oil and creative writing as my primary means of artistic expression. Do you have any interesting stories from creating your art or in your day to day life? Every day of my life from as far back as I can remember I have been involved in some kind of creative project. I have learned to ‘turn the juice on”, pretty much at will. The creative juice helped develop my character as a child, it helped pay my way through school, it gave me career direction, it paid the bills for a lifetime to raise a family of three children (I was very handy to have around the house during school project time), and it has provided me with an exciting and enriching retirement plan. How do your studio and surroundings influence your work? My studio is several hundred square feet of creative space with every nature of project in process, however I wish it were bigger, brighter, and located somewhere on a mountain top amidst virgin forest and mountain streams. Do you have a favorite tool to work with or that inspires your work? I like a good garden shovel, but it doesn’t help much with my painting. What impresses you about other artists’ work and who impresses you today? Really I can’t say there are too many artists that DON’T impress me. As long as they are conscientiously and consistently attempting to create something original as opposed to reproducing ‘formula’ art for the sake of more sales. In my opinion a painting should have an immediate impact on the mind and emotions of the viewer, but if the emotional response of the viewer is always the same, I’m afraid it doesn’t give testimony to too much depth in the artist. As an artist I manipulate paint to illicit the emotions generated by the inspiration that is going on deep inside me. If every piece of art an artist creates looks essentially the same the creator of the art would have to be very one dimensional. Since no person is one dimensional, it can only mean a compromise of personal and artistic integrity. This may not be a philosophy that generates much revenue but I believe that ‘true art’ is created inside the artist and then finds it’s way out and onto the canvas not by a learned technique but by way of ‘INSPIRED’ execution. When you are not working and creating, what do you do? Do you have another job? I’m pretty much always creating. I own a full service commercial sign and graphics studio. Design and creative work is my first duty. When I am not painting or designing I am writing. Lots of poetry, short stories and a couple of book manuscripts on the go. What is your favourite thing to do on a Friday night, or on the weekend? My weeks are really so busy I don’t sit down until Friday night, so by then my brain is more than ready for an escape into a good movie, and a bowl of popcorn. Then after the movie I am ready to paint or write again (usually I do both). What differentiates you from other artists? They’re still sane! Is there anything else you'd like to add? Yes, several hundred thousand dollars to my bank account! (Kidding again) Just a big THANK YOU to anyone who has bought my art, or anyone who has ever just appreciated it!

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New! Meet the Artist: Robert LeClerc

Welcome to the first edition of our Meet The Artist series: a monthly feature on our website giving you a little more information and perspective into the lives of our many talented artists!  We hope you enjoy this first edition, and that you will look forward to future editions on the first Saturday of every month. Today we would like to introduce you to one of Crescent Hill’s newer artists: Robert LeClerc.  His distinct style is a wonderful new addition to the collections available here at the gallery, so we hope that you enjoy his work as much as we do, and that you enjoy learning a little more about this very talented painter. Give us a little history of you: where you came from and how you got where you are today: 22 years years ago I was the president of a company that employed 40 people, and one day I decided to leave it all behind to devote myself to my favourite pastime: painting. I made this change for my inner well-being and the desire to find my true self.  I seek to be pure and to infuse my work with this purity, aspiring to honesty I make a point of showing this aspect of myself in each of my spatula strokes: they are applied without compromise, with the image of what I am or what I aspire to be, foremost in the act of creation.  Each painting is a torrent of emotions inspired by bringing peace, love, joy, and a spiritual aspect to the world. Describe your technique:  I would call my technique multidimensional impressionist cubism.  Viewed up close my work often seems abstract in style, and it is only when one steps back and views the paintings from a greater distance that the figurative elements become obvious.  My design ideas come from photos that I take on my travels, as well as from my imagination and how I feel. My style is very personal – you don’t need to read my signature to recognize one of my paintings.  They are all created using the “Alla Prima” technique, meaning that there are no prior drafts of the design, which results in very unique work. What other types of art and materials have you explored and what is your favourite medium? In my past, I have explored pastels, acrylic, and watercolour, but my favourite medium is oil. Do you have any interesting stories from creating your art or in your day to day life? When I was starting out I could see my style in my mind, but I wasn’t able to put it on canvas.  It took me more than a thousand paintings before I had the technical skill to do it.  I’ve also been a vegetarian for the last 12 years, and haven’t had any alcohol in 35 years. How do your studio and surroundings influence your work? Everything around me is clean – I seek to be pure and to infuse this aspect of me into each of my spatula strokes. The only things that I keep in my studio for inspiration are my paintings, and I use only one spatula to paint.   What impresses you about other artists’ work and who impresses you today? I am very impressed when an artist puts a lot of paint on his canvas without using modeling paste because the degree of difficulty is much higher for that style of work. When you are not working and creating, what do you do? Do you have another job? For many years now painting has been my full time job, but I enjoy relaxing, watching TV, social dancing, riding my bicycle, walking, and sometimes playing golf. What differentiates you from other artists? In my paintings you can find a symbiosis of the two ingredients that characterize me – my technique and my spontaneity make me unique.  Anyone who has one of my paintings can be transported to another dimension where the enchantment of the creative artist reigns.

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